WWA Info Exchange

For Woodworkers By Woodworkers
It is currently Tue May 18, 2021 12:21 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 8:08 am 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2003 1:01 am
Posts: 139
Location: Franklin, TN, USA
I just posted a problem on my table saw but I also have a situation with my bandsaw.
I'm building Tons of cabinets and trim for this whole house project. I have plenty of kiln dried white oak from my property. I have a Grizzly 17" anniversary addition 2 hp bandsaw. I have been trying to successfully resaw several lengths of 8 quarter X 6" by 6' planks. I installed a brand new 1" 3TPI carbide blade. Set the tension correctly. Adjusted all the guides and roller bearings. I have planned 2 edges to square and am using a tall fence. Still no matter what I do the blade nearly burns thru at a very slow feed rate and does not cut straight. I am frustrated. Any suggestion? And yes my moisture meter says 11%. Thanks for tour advice
Jim in Franklin, TN


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 9:03 am 
Offline
Veteran
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2004 1:01 am
Posts: 11333
Location: Hamilton, MS
Jimongee wrote:
I just posted a problem on my table saw but I also have a situation with my bandsaw.
I'm building Tons of cabinets and trim for this whole house project. I have plenty of kiln dried white oak from my property. I have a Grizzly 17" anniversary addition 2 hp bandsaw. I have been trying to successfully resaw several lengths of 8 quarter X 6" by 6' planks. I installed a brand new 1" 3TPI carbide blade. Set the tension correctly. Adjusted all the guides and roller bearings. I have planned 2 edges to square and am using a tall fence. Still no matter what I do the blade nearly burns thru at a very slow feed rate and does not cut straight. I am frustrated. Any suggestion? And yes my moisture meter says 11%. Thanks for tour advice
Jim in Franklin, TN


I'd suggest using a sled guided by the outboard miter slot, if you can, instead of the fence. I've had a similar problem (although shorter boards), and a simple homemade sled (much like you'd use for slabbing small logs) cured the problem. You'll need to set up some infeed/outfeed support stands to catch the long sled.

_________________
I bring to life, I bring to death:
The spirit does but mean the breath:
I know no more. (Tennyson, In Memoriam)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 10:11 am 
Offline
Veteran
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 01, 2002 1:01 am
Posts: 1284
Location: Kerrville, Texas USA
Not trying to be smart but have you checked
that the blade is not on backward. (teeth pointing up)
DAMHIKT.

Duan

_________________
Duan Packard
Kerrville, Texas

dum vivimus, vivamus


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 11:02 am 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2003 1:01 am
Posts: 139
Location: Franklin, TN, USA
Thanks Gene, but if I use a sled it will also need a tall fence to support a 6" wide board. Wouldn't that be the same as my existing fence? Maybe I. Confused.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 26, 2018 4:21 pm 
Offline
Veteran
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2004 1:01 am
Posts: 11333
Location: Hamilton, MS
Jimongee wrote:
Thanks Gene, but if I use a sled it will also need a tall fence to support a 6" wide board. Wouldn't that be the same as my existing fence? Maybe I. Confused.


I was expecting that question :wink: . And it does seem that way, however the sled eliminates the problem of keeping the workpiece properly aligned with the blade in 3 dimensions. What you are dealing with is the natural tendency of the blade to take the path of least resistance. And you should run the wood thru "downhill" ( grain cathedral points last thru).

Of course the sled itself needs to be precise in all three dimensions throughout it's length, hence it must be adjustable. The workpiece can be attached to the sled fence with 2 sided carpet tape.

_________________
I bring to life, I bring to death:
The spirit does but mean the breath:
I know no more. (Tennyson, In Memoriam)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 12:05 pm 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Mon Jan 27, 2003 1:01 am
Posts: 139
Location: Franklin, TN, USA
Thanks Gene. I will take your advice and see how it goes


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2018 6:49 pm 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Thu Apr 15, 1999 12:01 am
Posts: 1359
Location: Albuquerque NM
At the risk of starting the whole bandsaw drift issue, is your saw cutting straight and parallel to the miter track? Michael Fortune has a good writeup in Fine Woodworking (Nov/Dec 2004) on tuning your saw, but the big takeaway is that you can tweak the saw to cut straight with no drift. The key is getting the blade at the right point on the wheel. Start by centering the centerline of the blade at the peak of the crown. If the blade is too far forward (ie towards you), the saw will cut with end of the board away from you tilted to the right. Too far back gives the reverse. Adjust the saw tracking to get a straight cut. If you have it right, you can feed a board along the fence and the blade will sit in the middle of the kerf. It took me years to stumble on this advice and now my saw tracks just as it should. (I'm using a 1" 3 TPI bi-metal blade).

No matter what you do, resawing 6" or larger oak is going to be work. A carbide blade is removing a lot of wood, so it's going to take a while. Strange as it may seem, you may be better off with a bi-metal blade which takes a thinner cut.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2018 3:27 pm 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2003 12:01 am
Posts: 106
Location: hawthorne, nj
Hi...i have the grizz 14 ultimate 4 many years. Without getting into your particulars pull up from youtube Snodgrass and how to adjust . Forget drift, forget sleds, forget fences...this guy will make ur saw sing. So many things are done wrong that he pointed out. I wud say always use a sharp clean blade. This presentation is a winner and should help.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2018 4:43 pm 
Offline
Veteran
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2006 10:44 am
Posts: 3951
Location: Skagit Co WA
DR beat me to it, but I would address the issue of blade drift first and foremost. Your fence has to be adjustable, of course, but most saws this size are.

Good luck - let us know what you find out.

_________________
Nullum Gratuitum Prandium

Cheers - Dennis


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group