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 Post subject: End grain cutting boards
PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:13 am 
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Again ...

In the process of making a few. End grain cutting boards. In the past I've used ordinary TiteBond II with OK results. But as I intend (hope) to sell a few, I'm wondering if that's the best choice. Once in the hands of the user, I lose all control over it's care and feeding so ... any suggestions for a better glue for the things? Considering two part resourcinol if I can still find it. I've had pretty good luck with it in the past. The drawback is the less than attractive glue line. Epoxy is another thought although I'm not thrilled with the thought of the mess I generally create when I use it. I've yet to try TiteBond III, perhaps it's time?

Thanks of any comments.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 12:28 pm 
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I have used Titebond II with good results on a few end grain cutting boards with no problems. I have also used it on many edge grain cutting boards with no problems.

When I give one for a gift I always make it clear......no dishwasher...........no soaking in water.

Also I use Salad bowl finish which seems to seal well and I think that helps.

Good Luck,

Ron

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 12:36 pm 
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I've used both TBII and III. Never had any complaints from anyone about them coming apart, including a couple local mom&pop restaurants I've sold to. The issue with restaurants is that they hate the maintenance they require, and sometimes will have problems from inspectors about them.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 12:53 pm 
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Thanks, guys. I've not had any failures from Titebond either, at least none have come back in pieces. Just thought I'd explore other possibilities. Titebond is definitely a lot easier to use than other options.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 1:38 pm 
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I have only used Titebond III and mineral oil on my cutting boards.
But then I have only made 5 or 6 of them.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 1:47 pm 
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DENNIS S: From a thread a long time ago, about maintainence on the cutting boards. The old wives remedy for keeping the boards well seasoned was to oil a board once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month for a year and once a year forever. Maybe including a note card about maintainence with your boards could take some back pressure off.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 9:12 am 
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On a side but related note:

I build my boards about 2 1/4" thick. I also put rubber feet attached with stainless steel scews. this keeps the cutting board about 1/4" above the counter top and out of any liquids that end up there. I think this is a good idea for sanitation and moisture absorption into the wood.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 3:21 pm 
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I like to put feet on mine as well, Reeliron. Not only for the reason(s) you mention but also it makes them more secure on the work surface.

Yep, Newtooth, it's mineral oil for me as well. I usually spend a day once they're all sanded out applying and reapplying oil to the point of saturation. I've also taken to including a small bottle of mineral oil with each one as an example and perhaps incentive to the new owners on maintenance.

By the way, I've found that my over arm sander is great for finishing both top and bottom surfaces.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 7:00 pm 
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On my last batch last year, I used a great little free program to design the boards - CBDesigner. Very easy to use with a little practice. Gives you all the info you need to customize your layout and cut list, and experiment with designs before you start cutting wood. If you haven't tried it out yet you can download it here: http://www.lastalias.com/cbdesigner/

Here's a screenshot of it:

Image

Image

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 8:18 pm 
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Polyurethane glue (Gorilla and others) is absolutely water resistant.
Messy but effective.
I have glued treated boards together that the glue held up and the boards roted away, ground contact over 5 to 10 yrs.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2017 11:51 pm 
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Daddy Gloves wrote:
Polyurethane glue (Gorilla and others) is absolutely water resistant.
Messy but effective.

I have glued treated boards together that the glue held up and the boards roted away, ground contact over 5 to 10 yrs.


heheheheh, I know that's a fact!

I was working with Gorilla glue on a rainy day, going up and down a muddy ladder, and the little bit of glue on my fingers picked up the mud from the ladder.... It took three or four days to wash off... :lol:

Gorilla glue is good stuff, but if it's not necessary, I avoid it.

I like Titebond 3... But Titebond 2 is better when you want a longer drying time.... on the bottle, #2 calls for one hour clamp time, and #3 calls for thirty minutes.

I've been using #3 for as long as it's been out. It's good stuff when it suits the job. It sands well too.

One other difference.. on the label...
#2 says "water resistant"
#3 says "waterproof"

But, for an end grain cutting board, I think the elasticity is the most important thing since it's moving in both directions... But I never made one, so I don't know... 8)


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:02 pm 
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Hey Dennis,

I use TBIII for my end grain cutting boards.

My 2ยข,
Tom

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