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 Post subject: What does
PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2016 10:08 pm 
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hagane and jigane have to do with woodworking? Go ahead and answer from knowledge or just a plain WAG but as always with fun in mind. PS if you agree or disagree with an answer post up with humor, charm and wit :roll:. AND if you have a side bar post that up also. This is suposed to be a little light and fun folks.


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 Post subject: Re: What does
PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2016 8:15 pm 
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A gentle nudge to the head of the list. Any takers out there?


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 Post subject: Re: What does
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2016 8:19 am 
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Types of Japanese blade steel, usually associated with knives, but also forged into woodworking blades.


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 Post subject: Re: What does
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2016 1:04 pm 
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Any relation to Rogain? I often have spells where I want to tear my hair out!


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 Post subject: Re: What does
PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2016 9:12 pm 
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Gene has the filings for this one. He is correct that Higane and Jigane are two forms of steel used in making cutting edged blades. Higane is a very hard steel that sharpens to and generally holds a very sharp edge, Jigane on the other hand is a softer more flexible steel that is used as the body of blades. The two steels are married together to optimize the characteristics of both steel forms. A recent Woodwrights shop episode showed the WILLIAMSBURG blacksmith making a chisel by blending a hard steel cutting edge onto a soft body of steel. The welding of the steels together apparently is an historically old method and traceable through many cultures. Using the technique of creating a very hard edge on a resilient body allows a tool that will remain sharp while being struck, with the body of the tool absorbing the shock of the blow which might have fractured the sharp but brittle cutting edge, such as a chisel or an adze or froe.

DENNIS S: gets a grin award for the reference to his stress reactions :D

This puzzler was up for a longer time frame in hopes that there would be more response and or discussion. Maybe the next one? :thumbup:


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