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 Post subject: Turning green chip out?
PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 1:29 pm 
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I am turning a green bowl and having problems with chip out on the end grain.
The tool is sharp.
Not sure what kind of wood I think it is green ash?? but it does not look like it.

Started on "Green log turining SOS"
http://www.woodworking.org/InfoExchange ... hp?t=29599

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2011 5:50 am 
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A couple of things come to mind.

What speed are you turning? The faster you go the cleaner the cut (and the scarier it gets).

What tool are you using? A gouge would be my choice and the angle of attack can make a difference. If it is gouge how is it ground?

It's also possible that its the wood. Is it real wet, throwing a spray of water? If it has dry spots it would mean that portions were dead and they tear easly.

Got any pics?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2011 1:48 pm 
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It's how you hold the tool that counts over "sharp." A razor is sharp, yet you can run your finger across it with no harm, or even press a bit. Just don't slide the finger along the blade. That's what you want to do with the business part of the gouge, present it so the lathe can slide the wood along the edge as much as possible. You don't turn the flute of the gouge up into the rotation, you turn it mostly parallel to rotation so it will cut across the wood. More you cut up versus across, worse the tear as you pack rather than slice.

Any rpm you select will bring the wood by at adequate fpm for smooth cuts. You do fine at paring speed with your carving tools, right? Slower is safer. Doesn't throw the water as far if the wood's wet, either. On the subject, some people deliberately wet the surface as a way to soften the wood for easier cutting.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 1:17 am 
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NBG said it.

Speed is not the issue. Tool control is.

There are three basic rules in tool control: A. B, C. Anchor, Bevel, Cut.

In other words, the tool is Anchored on the tool rest. Fully supported and not overly extended beyond the tool rest.. Then you rub the bevel. Present the tool so the very back heel of the bevel is rubbing the wood. Slowly raise and pull back the handle until you see just the very hint of fuzz coming off the wood then proceed just a bit more to Cut. In this manner your Cutting the wood instead of scraping.

I'm assuming you have your piece mounted as a faceplate turning as opposed to a spindle project since it's a bowl. The key thing to remember to get the cleanest cuts is to cut in the direction that will provide the most support to the wood fibers. Think of a piece of wood as composed of a bundle of straws running parallel with the vertical grain. On face plate turning, these straws are perpendicular to the axis of the lathe. So on the inside of the bowl you'd make your finishing cuts from the outter rim towards the center. That way the end grain on either side of the bowl would be supported, and just the opposite for the outside of the bowl.

Can you post a picture with low angle lighting or something to illustrate your problem?

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