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 Post subject: Dado Blade
PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 6:34 pm 
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Any know how high you can run a Dado Blade safely? :confused:

AG


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 Post subject: Re: Dado Blade
PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 6:47 pm 
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agriffee wrote:
Any know how high you can run a Dado Blade safely? :confused:

AG



well if you end up cutting through the board THAT! was too far.

take several passes as you would a router bit if need be when it comes to being safe okay?

just take the appropriate amount of time to allow the blade. to hog out the material and you will be fine. Have the Espresso after that portion of the job... :wink:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 7:01 pm 
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Don't know, but Mango's advise is good. I've never had a reason to cut more than an inch or so, usually only a 1/2" or less. Whatcha makin'?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 7:36 pm 
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Those Sleigh bed rails have a two inch wide tenon on 5 1/2 " rail. I've cut about 1 1/4" deep, gonna stop there with dado and finish with saw blade or by hand. Seeing that dado blade run that high scares me.

Was looking at that Highboy you're building, guess that's what it's called. Very nice looking project! Looking forward to seeing it finished. Always wanted to build one but don't need it myself and can't build it just to look at.

AG


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 8:06 pm 
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agriffee wrote:
Those Sleigh bed rails have a two inch wide tenon on 5 1/2 " rail. I've cut about 1 1/4" deep, gonna stop there with dado and finish with saw blade or by hand. Seeing that dado blade run that high scares me.

Was looking at that Highboy you're building, guess that's what it's called. Very nice looking project! Looking forward to seeing it finished. Always wanted to build one but don't need it myself and can't build it just to look at.

AG


If I understand, you're standing the rail on ends and cutting the tenon cheeks? Why not lay the rail flat and nibble the cheeks out? Easy enough to do if you use a sled.

Chest on Chest, actually. The difference being that a "High boy" is a single case, whereas this is essentially 2 separate cases stacked, with the upper being slightly smaller in width and depth. Original design was from the book I mentioned in the thread, but with several changes "recommended" by my wife :wink:, so it probably will only bear faint resemblance to the original design. The joinery and general construction is the same tho, which is the important part (for me anyway ) :) .

The drawer front design she wants I think will be somewhat unique, in that she wants it to match the bed I did last year.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 9:06 pm 
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I did do the side cuts, now have to cut dado's down to 2" wide. Will do with table saw blade. Thanks.

Have avoided doing wide DT on projects where should have used. Will check with you next time need to do those. Saw yours on your Chest on Chest.

AG


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 9:50 pm 
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agriffee wrote:
I did do the side cuts, now have to cut dado's down to 2" wide. Will do with table saw blade. Thanks.

Have avoided doing wide DT on projects where should have used. Will check with you next time need to do those. Saw yours on your Chest on Chest.

AG


RE: dt's. A couple useful tools for this sort of thing which doesn't lend itself to a Leigh type jig and router is this setup from Veritas: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx ... at=1,42884 . I use mine a lot. They've added a couple different angles since I bought mine, I notice. Some folks are good enough to freehand it all, but I cheat. :wink:

The other thing I'd recommend (if you don't already have it) is; "The Complete Illustrated Guide to Joinery", by Gary Rogowski . Saved my bacon more than once.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2010 8:13 am 
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Have bookmarked that tool for purchase when ready. Thanks AG. Ps: Didn't know such a tool exhisted.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:20 am 
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I'm not so sure that Gene didn't get his point across correctly.

Part of the problem is semantics. We must share a common language to understand what is being described. Please take no offense, but a "side cut" is not a common term used on a tenon. We may think we know what you mean by it, but perhaps not.

Unfortunately, I can't find a picture that illustrates the components of a tenon online at the moment.

However, here is a picture to illustrate how to use a stacked dado to cut a tenon. A wobble dado set would work just the same. Stolen from Woodworkers Guide Blog

Image

Note that the only adjustment that is critical is the height of the blade to describe the thickness of the tenon. i.e. the width, length of the tenon and/or board is irrelevant. Also note the zero clearance insert.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2010 11:34 am 
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Better description than I gave Dan, and the pic helps. Cheeks and shoulders :) . I've cut the cheeks on short boards using a tenoning jig with the board vertical, although I don't like to do that. With long boards it's just to unsteady. Prefer the way you showed, especially when you can use stop on the fence just in front of the blade to get the distance the same around the tenon for both cheeks and shoulders, or a stop on the miter gage.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 24, 2010 2:09 pm 
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OK Guys my bad. Guess I didn't use the proper terms. Your picture is what I termed side, meaning the side of a board flat. The cut I was referring to was with the board standing up.The dado would have to be raised 3 1/4"! I cut 1 1/4" but decided was too dangerous even if I do have a long extension on my saw.

I've decided to either cut it with the table saw or by hand.

Thanks , AG


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 25, 2010 10:15 am 
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No worries. As long as we all know what we're talking about we'll be able to help out. :D

If the tenon is sticking up in the air, think of it as the profile of a man. You have 'shoulders' on both sides (actually all the way around both the collar bone and shoulder blades are shoulders as well ;) ) and a head sticking up in the air, on each side of the head are the 'cheeks'.

Sorta makes sense now, eh?


Your picture is what I termed side, meaning the side of a board flat.

This is illustration is making the 'shoulder' cut.


The cut I was referring to was with the board standing up.


That is making the 'cheek' cut.



And yes, a long bed rail is a dangerous thing to cut tenon cheeks upon. Lay them flat as shown in the above illustration.

Now short rails as used in cabinet doors for example would be fine positioned upright.

It is a learning process and we all sometimes attempt things we shouldn't when we first start out. If you mind says "this doesn't feel right"; stop and reconsider. Been there many times. Still find myself there today. :D

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