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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 10:41 am 
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I was about to tilt the blade and cut some 45's then realized I do not have an extra insert.

Well I got one now, QUESTION: is the process the same, do you lower blade, then turn on, then raise it slowly in the tilted position?

thanks,

James.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:16 am 
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That's how I do it.

I do ensure that the insert is securely held down.
Generally I clamp a board across the TS top, front and back, over the insert.

This makes the operation safe, and promotes a proper angle for the kerf.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:25 am 
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DMoening wrote:
That's how I do it.

I do ensure that the insert is securely held down.
Generally I clamp a board across the TS top, front and back, over the insert.

This makes the operation safe, and promotes a proper angle for the kerf.


Good Idea with the board. I always put the fence over it and never felt warm and fuzzy about it! :) :)

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:34 am 
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I always put the fence over it and never felt warm and fuzzy about it!

Yeah, I didn't want to say in public that I've done that. :roll: :oops:

Especially when the insert is less than snug and it begins to bounce around a little ... or so I've heard. :D

It's why I switched to the clamp-the-board method.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 12:42 pm 
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I agree w/ Dennis, James. I just put one on my Griz (think it's the same one you have) and used their blank insert and noticed that they had already cut the "dado" in the bottom.

Frankly though, I wouldn't use the zero clearence insert for a 45. When you need to cut a different angle you're stuck w/ having to get another insert. And, I'm not sure that the saw would always rise at the same pitch every time. W/ the 90 you're only raising in one plane, w/ the 45, you're raising in two planes at once. This just strikes me as problematic at best and dangerous at worst.

The "angle" insert that came w/ the saw is all I use.

Just me 2cents.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 12:52 pm 
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Often I make several zero clearance inserts at a time, 8 or 10. Or only for those I need to replace.

This is the way I proceed:
1. Make or buy blank inserts. It is fairly easy to make them with a bandsaw and a pattern bit for my router.

2. Put my dado blades with all the blades installed. Crank down the dado set to the bottom.

3. Place a scrap board over the insert and raise the blades so I cut out about 1/4". Repeat this for all the inserts except the last one. That I crank up all the way As high as it can go. This gives me the zero clearance insert for my widest dado. Mark the insert with the width. Important!

4. Change dado blade for my next most popular dado width say 3/4". Put an insert in the saw. MOVE the scrap board. Bring the blade up all the way. Mark the insert with the width. Important!

5. Continue with my other popular dado widths. Moving the scrap board each time and.... Mark the insert with the width. Important!

6. Put in a normal blade and repeat the procedure. Mark the insert with the blade width.

7. Tilt the blade to 30* and repeat the procedure. Mark the insert with the blade width and tilt.

8. Tilt the blade to 45* and make that insert. Mark the insert with the blade width and tilt.

9. Repeat for my thin kurf blade.

The reason I take the time to put the blind dado in the insert is that I find my blade stabilizer will often hit the insert before my blade has reached it's highest.

Also note that I do not run my saw with anything but zero clearance inserts.

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 Post subject: Zero clearence insert
PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:06 pm 
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Thank you all very much. The information here is priceless.

Quote:
I'm not sure that the saw would always rise at the same pitch every time. W/ the 90 you're only raising in one plane, w/ the 45, you're raising in two planes at once. This just strikes me as problematic at best and dangerous at worst.


This was my concern as well, I also wondered about different angles, (different inserts I would guess).

Well so far I have never tilted my blade and now I have a lot more to think about.

thanks again.


James

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:47 pm 
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I do it pretty much like Dan described.
I cut a "0" clearance 45* insert along time ago.... Over the years the "0" 45* has become a + or - 45 not quite "0" but, it doesn't bother me because it is still better than the OEM open insert that came with the saw. It is kinda like horse shoes and hand gernades....close is close enough. :D

Rog

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 2:20 pm 
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I've made (and re-made) many over the years.

Some still have life in them. Don't know what the top 2 are, they're not labeled. ;)

Image

Over the years the "0" 45* has become a + or - 45
RRoger will recognize the 25*-35* one. :D

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 2:34 pm 
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I've made both 90 and 45's. When you tilt the blade, you are tilting the entire carrage assembly so that when the blade is raised and lowered, it's still just moving in a single plane, which is parrallel with the blade, even on the angle. The one thing I found out with my Jet Supersaw, was that when I'm at max height on a 45, I had to create a cavity to allow the end of the arbor and nut to move into.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:38 pm 
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DennisS wrote:
James -

You don't mention which saw you have but --- on my Unisaw, and I suspect a lot of other cabinet saws the blade only retracts to just slightly below the top of the table. Meaning if you put a new uncut throat plate on the saw the blade is actually in the way. The only way I've found to safely get the blade slot started is to put a smaller 8" blade on the saw and use it to start the cut for the blade slot. Commercial throat plates come with what looks like a dished out cut in the bottom done with perhaps a dado blade which would work as well. But knowing just how far to raise the dado blade into the new raw insert is problematic .... for me.

Perhaps some of our more advanced sawyers have some ad-vice.


I haven't advanced past a chisel, personally, but it works fine, and I don't have to change blades.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:30 pm 
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DennisS wrote:
James -
I suspect a lot of other cabinet saws the blade only retracts to just slightly below the top of the table. Perhaps some of our more advanced sawyers have some ad-vice.


I don't know about more advanced, but what I do is cut a kerf on the bottom of the insert by sliding it along the saw.... this creates a relief cut that allows the insert to sit flat before the plunge cut.

I outlined it here in my tut
http://www.woodworking.org/InfoExchange ... hp?t=18786
Lawrence


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:56 pm 
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My Bosch contractors saw has a clip in back of the insert that secures it in place when in use. How do you secure the zero inserts that you fabricate?

Ed


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 6:15 pm 
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Capm Ed wrote:
My Bosch contractors saw has a clip in back of the insert that secures it in place when in use. How do you secure the zero inserts that you fabricate?

Ed


I make mine fit a little snug so it's just gravity and friction. Your saw is probably a bit different, so you may need to develop a small metal screw on tab that will do the same as your factory insert. Or, you may descide that you don't need the tab to make it work. By the sounds of it, the tab is there to keep the insert from being pulled up by the back of the blade, but personally, I've never heard of that happening on any saw before, though yours may be different.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 3:44 pm 
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Capm Ed: Regarding your Bosch TS ...... this is what I did for my neighbor as he was VERY concerned about the insert becoming air born. (has now found the following not necessary !! ) Form your insert to proper size, drill 4 holes to match levelling screws from original plate, countersink, use 10/32 machine screws to anchor into base. You *must* make a relief cut on the left side of new insert about saw blade wide by about one third insert depth, full length cut not required.this is to make it fit flush with table top. Take a peek at the exisiting plate, rather obvious HTH


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 26, 2010 12:06 am 
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Thanks for the feedback about securing the insert. I have always been concerned about it getting kicked out while in use. I have made several and you do need to make the cutout on one side so that it will sit flush with the table.

Ed


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