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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 12:42 pm 
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If not, then here's an interesting tutorial from PopWood.

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/artic ... ing_design

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 2:30 pm 
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My drawers aren't graduated! They never went to school! :D :D :D

I'm sorry, Gene. I just couldn't let that go by.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 3:05 pm 
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Larry you beat me to it. :D :D

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 4:14 pm 
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Larry Norton wrote:
My drawers aren't graduated! They never went to school! :D :D :D

I'm sorry, Gene. I just couldn't let that go by.


Actually, Larry, I was thinking of you when I phrased it that way ( The Thong ) . :lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 5:13 pm 
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I've made many chests and yes I always graduated them only because most of the antiques I looked at were that way.

BTW, all of my drawers were in school for some time.............literally! :wink:

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 5:19 pm 
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Gene, I also read somewhere when making drawers, always put the heaviest grain toward the bottom of the drawer front. I have always followed this rule and I believe it does add to the appearance. Otherwise they look................."top heavy" for lack of a better term.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 5:25 pm 
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reelinron wrote:
Gene, I also read somewhere when making drawers, always put the heaviest grain toward the bottom of the drawer front. I have always followed this rule and I believe it does add to the appearance. Otherwise they look................."top heavy" for lack of a better term.


Hadn't considered that before, but it makes sense. Thanks. :)

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 5:41 pm 
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One more thing, then I'll put a lid on it.

When making drawers that are the same height in a row, for instance inside a secretary desk or the top three drawers of a buffett. Make all three drawer fronts from the same board and keep them in the natural order from left to right so the grain makes a continuum. I would do this even if I had to buy an extra board. I've done it both ways and it really makes a difference IMHO. :wink:

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 6:00 pm 
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reelinron wrote:
One more thing, then I'll put a lid on it.

When making drawers that are the same size in a row, for instance inside a secretary desk or the top three drawers of a buffett. Make all three drawer fronts from the same board and keep them in the natural order from left to right so the grain makes a continuum. I would do this even if I had to buy an extra board. I've done it both ways and it really makes a difference IMHO. :wink:


That I do, and you're right. Even if there is a space or break between them, as on the gun display I made a while back. Symmetry counts for a lot. :)

Image

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 6:04 pm 
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Looks great, that is quite a collection you have going there

Those two flintlocks have really different butt plates on them. Are they both rifles or is one a shotgun?

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 6:24 pm 
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reelinron wrote:
Looks great, that is quite a collection you have going there

Those two flintlocks have really different butt plates on them. Are they both rifles or is one a shotgun?


Neither is a flinter. The top one is a .50 cal Pennsylvania Longrifle - percussion cap, smooth bore, made around 1860, by James Bown. The one below is a cartridge 12 gage (blackpowder cartridges), made around 1885 in Belgium, with laminated barrels (which was a variation of the "Damascus" barrel). Commonly called a "Rabbit ear double" due to the hammers. Neither is a shooter right now, but I'll be taking them both to a local gunsmith this Spring to have them restored to shooting condition, I hope. May not be possible. The Penn saw action in the US Civil War (or as it's known down here: The War of Northern Aggression ;) ), and later on in Texas.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 6:31 pm 
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Nice guns, saw the arms and thought flint! :oops:

I have a modern 50 cal. flintlock that I used for deer hunting. Never got one with it, but intimidated a few! :D :D






























tc :oops

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2010 11:33 pm 
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I've also seen articles that suggest using the Golden Ratio to determine successive drawer heights. I've always just done it by eye with pretty good success in terms of functionality and visual appearance (as judged by others, not just me).


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:22 am 
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I'm with Dennis . . .

When I designed my outfeed table, I went with what I wanted to put in them. So for screwdrivers and hand tools and such, I went with shallow drawers. I wanted bigger drawers on the bottom for storing bigger tools like circular saws.

I also picked depths that were nice even numbers (2", 5", 10" . . . etc.) just to make the math easier.

Image

Oh, and these drawers got their GED, so they kind of graduated, but not really. :wink:

-Brian


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