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PostPosted: Sat Jan 02, 2010 10:31 pm 
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Is there an "easy" way to cut a perfect length to a piece mitered on both ends such as edging? A very slight error is very obvious to viewing. A pencil line is way to thick. A knife cut is difficult to see when using the chop saw. Any tricks to getting the fourth piece of the edging to fit perfectly or is it just trial, error, and experience?

Geoff


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 11:00 am 
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A stop block is probably the best way, imho - assuming you're talking about equal length for opposing pieces such as a picture frame. If you are making a perfect square then only one stop position is needed, a rectangle would require moving the stop. Other shapes requiring different miter angles will usually have equal sides all around, but the same principal applies.

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 Post subject: Not repeating
PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 12:19 pm 
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I don't think a stop block would help as I'm only cutting one piece. I'm putting an edging on a table, and after glueing on 3 sides have a side for which I have to cut a very precise length stick mitered at both ends. i.e. it has to fit between the beginning of stick #1 and the end of stick #3 which are fastened onto the first 3 sides of the table top.

I have measured by mitering one end of stick #4, holding it up to the space it is destined for, and marking the length to cut. I've tried to allow for parallax. If it is just a tad too long I shave off less than a 1/32 and the gap is noticable.

I'm using an inexpensive chop saw with a low quality blade but I don't see/feel any slop in the saw.

Geoff


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 12:38 pm 
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That is a very difficult thing to do. DAMHIKT :roll:
I usually am very happy if the 4th piece is just a tad too long. The best thing to do in that case is use a sanding block and 100 grit sandpaper. to shorten the piece a little at a time by sanding and re-fitting several times. I know that it is difficult to sand and keep the 45* angle but, at least you can get the length easier and if the angle has a bit of gap to the inside, it is easier to fill with out much notice.
Depending on the job at hand, I sometimes like to make my bevel cuts 45-1/4* (just a tad over 45*) so that the outside corners fit nice and snug and any gap is on the inside so that I can fill it with shellac (or glue) and saw dust to cut down on the noticable goof. :D
Hope that helps.

Rog

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 Post subject: Will try that
PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 1:19 pm 
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Rog, that is interesting. Years ago, during my first try at woodworking, a friend who was a cabinet maker by trade told me to make the angles a bit too sharp. His reasoning followed yours. I think the cutting close and sanding will be the best method for me.

Geoff

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 03, 2010 9:24 pm 
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I use the table saw and an Incra miter gauge and the angles almost always fit perfectly angle and a stop block for length.
A well tuned radial arm saw with a jig is the fastest I have found if you have a lot to cut. A ras out of tune is a very frustrating tool.
For frames a spline helps with alignment on small frames small biscuits for door and window trim etc.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 12:42 am 
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Geoff,

Recently I had to do this for the aquarium stand that I built. I had to cut a similar piece to what you are describing for four different trim pieces, two quarter rounds and two straight pieces. What I did was measure the gap from the outside point to outside point and mark that on my piece. Then I took my piece to the aquarium stand, and visually looked at it "in place" and marked a spot just wider than I thought I would need.

With this mark, I went to the compounf mitre saw and cut the longer mark, and tested the fit. Too wide (which was the plan), so back to the mitre saw to just shave off tiny sections until I had the snug fir I was looking for.

for the 4 pieces I needed I only went through 10 pieces of wood to get it right! :D j/k

Good luck!

-Roy

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 Post subject: Thanks everyone
PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2010 12:38 pm 
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The present project was a drill press table, appearance not a premium. Rather than make a new piece I left one miter with a 1/32" slit in it.

These ideas, though, give me good fodder for the next time when I'm making something more "sophisticated." I'll get a good blade for my chop/miter saw. I looked at the sites with the miter shooting board. They look like a straight forward and easy way of trimming to an knife line. I'll try that as well.

Thanks for all your input.

Geoff


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2011 1:49 pm 
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A few years ago I saw a video on a little trick to "sneak up" on a cut in the miter saw.

As a number of folks have mentioned the edge in question should be cut a little long. Doing a test fit will give you an idea of how much too long it is. Back to the miter saw. Fit the piece against the fence and lower the blade. Bring the piece all the way to the blade. If you're blade is a carbide tip model, the subsequent cut will be about a 64th.

The other approach is to force the piece against the blade at a tooth (against the carbide edge). You'll notice that the blade will deflect slightly. Hold the piece tight as you raise the blade and the subsequent cut will be very light.

Might take a little practice to get the feel but it's worked well for me.

Good Luck.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2012 9:21 am 
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For precise miter cuts I jst cut long and" Creep up" to final dimension.when cutting a single piece.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 10:06 pm 
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Hey Geoff,

Probably too late to help but, whenever I need to cut to a very precise line, I use a marking knife, and then rub white chalk into the scored line. I cut up to the line, and then subsequently cut to erase the chalk, but leave the near side of the scored line. That's as precise as I can get.

Tom

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 10:08 pm 
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Hey Geoff,

Probably too late to help but, whenever I need to cut to a very precise line, I use a marking knife, and then rub white chalk into the scored line. I cut up to the line, and then subsequently cut to erase the chalk, but leave the near side of the scored line. That's as precise as I can get.

That said, a shooting board and plane will allow you to sneak up on the line better than a crosscutting saw.

Tom

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