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PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2009 1:42 pm 
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Rog,

I forgot that fix was in response to a specific issue. The boards had been run through the jointer and planer, so everything was hunky-dory up to that point. However, since I was using longer boards, I didn't cross-cut them on the table saw using the mitre gauge. I used my radial arm, which I typically use for rough cuts only, so it was not anywhere close to being dialed in. The resulting cross-cuts where not perpendicular to the face and edge.

I knew that when I clamped up the issue with the face would more or less self correct and could be smoothed by sanding or planing. The problem with the edge however wouldn't be as forgiving, there were small but noticable gaps during dry fit where edge grain came together, so that's why I came up with the fix. I just forgot that when I posted.

I do have another little trick.

I mix my own shellac and even though I grind the dry flakes down to much smaller size, remembering to go shake the jar now and again to avoid clumping didn't alway happen. I know that eventually the clump will dissolve, but sometimes I needed the shellac today rather than tomorrow.

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See ""


A simple dowel with a cross piece attached, chucked into the drill press at low speed became my automatic stirrer. The clamp is to keep the jar far creeping. And since the mixture is constantly being agitated, the flakes dissolve VERY quickly.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 11:04 pm 
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Hey Guys,

Here's one that I haven't posted for awhile: One quart yogurt or cottage cheese containers make great taper fit adapters for 4" dust collection hoses. Not everyone's idea of 4" is the same when it comes to pipe, hoses, fittings, etc. Cut the bottom out of the tapered container and it works great!

Tom

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 4:20 pm 
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Just thought of another tip that most of us old guys know but some of the younger ones....?????!!!!
When ever you come across a really big rubber band or an intertube for an old tire (don't find them much anymore) maybe a tube from a bike or wheelbarrow. KEEP IT!!!! They make really good clamps for odd shapes of wood working. Even bungee cords (if they have the plastic hooks) will work at times.
If you are lucky enough to get a car tire tube, cut it into sections about an inch or inch and a half wide to make a rubber band or, cut it around the circumfrance to get REALLY BIG rubber bands!
When I glue up things like octagon columns for lamps or tables, I use the good old blue tape to get it together and then start putting my big rubber bands around it for clamping pressure. Even just strips of rubber will work if you wrap it tight and tie the ends together.
Surgical tubing is just fantastic for this if you can locate some.
Then just toss it into a small drawer or box for future use when you are done, you WILL need them again later!

Rog

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2009 7:02 pm 
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Rapid Roger wrote:
When ever you come across a really big rubber band or an intertube for an old tire (don't find them much anymore) maybe a tube from a bike or wheelbarrow. KEEP IT!!!! They make really good .....


Hinges for shop boxes !!

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 Post subject: battery chargers
PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 12:31 am 
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Location: Rootstown, Ohio USA
Put a simple lamp timer on your battery chargers. I have many different chargers/batteries that require different charging times. Instead of killing them because I forgot to unplug them, just use a timer. Set if for the 3 hours or what ever and forget it.
Of course remember, it will turn back on in 24 hours and charge again. :-D


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 4:26 pm 
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It always seemed a waste to throw away a broken bandsaw blade.....especially if through some error I managed to brake a fairly fresh one.

I made this some years ago and thought I'd share it

It's made from some aluminium (aluminum) channel, a scrap of ply (because the channel was a little deep) and some epoxy glue.

The result.... a rasp on steroids! :-D

Not a fine tool but great for rough work.
Although I haven't used it for that purpose yet, I suspect that it will be pretty handy at rough carving prior to refining with gouges etc.

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Image


Anybody got any other ideas for broken BS blades? or for anything else that would 'normally' would be regarded as trash?


Ray

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 17, 2009 6:56 am 
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Rapid Roger wrote:
Just thought of another tip that most of us old guys know but some of the younger ones....?????!!!!
When ever you come across a really big rubber band or an intertube for an old tire (don't find them much anymore) maybe a tube from a bike or wheelbarrow. KEEP IT!!!! They make really good clamps for odd shapes of wood working. Even bungee cords (if they have the plastic hooks) will work at times.
If you are lucky enough to get a car tire tube, cut it into sections about an inch or inch and a half wide to make a rubber band or, cut it around the circumfrance to get REALLY BIG rubber bands!
When I glue up things like octagon columns for lamps or tables, I use the good old blue tape to get it together and then start putting my big rubber bands around it for clamping pressure. Even just strips of rubber will work if you wrap it tight and tie the ends together.
Surgical tubing is just fantastic for this if you can locate some.
Then just toss it into a small drawer or box for future use when you are done, you WILL need them again later!

Rog


Or if you don't run across those things or need them quickly, a yard of outdoor pond liner costs almost nothing, is tough as anything and can be cut to size/length with a box cutter.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 17, 2009 6:59 am 
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Sawdust/powder makes your hands slippery which can be dangerous around machinery where a good grip is essential for safety. I always keep a damp sponge nearby so I can quickly dab my fingers and palm before using a router, planer, etc.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:13 pm 
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IF using Titebond II or Titebond III and you want to save your
applicator have a small container of water handy to drop the
applicator in. Saves one of those Oh ... moments when you realize
a hour later that you did not clean up your applicator.

Duan

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 1:38 am 
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Laying a silicone cloth over your chisels prevents rust. You need to wipe the silicone off before use. Not just to prevent the silicone from contacting the wood but more to prevent it from slipping in your hands.

The silica bags that come with all your equipment (cameras stereos’ and more) are also great item to toss in your tool drawers or cabinets.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 9:37 am 
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Mango wrote:
The silica bags that come with all your equipment (cameras stereos’ and more) are also great item to toss in your tool drawers or cabinets.


Mango, I can vouch for that idea. When I was in the mobil tool business I would toss several silica bags in the drawers of sockets in my truck. Especially the impact style (no crome) and they did a great job of stopping rust year around. Have a few packets in my personal tool box too.

Rog

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An ounce of responsibility is worth a pound of State and Federal laws.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 09, 2009 11:08 am 
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Rapid Roger wrote:
Mango wrote:
The silica bags that come with all your equipment (cameras stereos’ and more) are also great item to toss in your tool drawers or cabinets.


Mango, I can vouch for that idea. When I was in the mobil tool business I would toss several silica bags in the drawers of sockets in my truck. Especially the impact style (no crome) and they did a great job of stopping rust year around. Have a few packets in my personal tool box too.

Rog


This does work, however you need to know that silica will only absorb only so much moisture, then it needs to be recharged so to speak.

Put it in an oven at 350 for 15 to 20 minutes (longer won't hurt). This will drive the moisture out. then throw it back into a drawer with your tools.

How often you need to do this will be depended on the humidity and how often you open the drawer.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2009 7:48 pm 
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I keep a roll of toilet paper and a chamber pot, or slop jar as some would call it, in my shop. Saves on trips into the house. Just remember to empty it before closing shop up.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 12:45 am 
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gg wrote:
I keep a roll of toilet paper and a chamber pot, or slop jar as some would call it, in my shop. Saves on trips into the house. Just remember to empty it before closing shop up.



I'll take the time out thank you. :D

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 26, 2009 5:39 pm 
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simple green and water 50/50 mix cleans most sanding belts fully in 24 hours.

hang to dry

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The land some where in the middle
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 8:55 pm 
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If there's a crack in a structural piece, like a boat plank, take a rabbet plane and gouge out a trough 1/2" deep along the length of the crack. Find a square piece of scrap that is long enough to do the job and epoxy it into the gouge, sand and paint, this tip is called "making a coachman."

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 20, 2009 10:10 am 
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save the dust(fairly good substitute for wood flour) from your ros bag, mix with epoxy to make a paste...can be colored with stain or other pigments


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 20, 2009 2:24 pm 
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Broken band, hack, jigsaw blades make great scratch stock cutters.

If you're using oil finish and get it on your hands, "wash" them with sawdust first. Then soap and water will finish the job with no leftover smell.

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 20, 2009 5:09 pm 
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I just had to refinish a real old butcher block table that had some separation between some of the boards going down the side. I used some body filler in the cracks, it sands down perfect and with shellac finish you can't tell they were ever there.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 24, 2009 2:34 pm 
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nails not always needed. when putting a piece of trim on. 1/2" to 3/4 " add your glue rub back forth on the joining piece then tape in place.

friction fit works well.

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The land some where in the middle
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