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 Post subject: Turning stock
PostPosted: Sat Aug 29, 2009 4:38 pm 
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Location: Cape Cod Massachusetts
A buddy of mine who owns a construction company dropped this off in my Driveway Wednesday Night.

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It's a real good size section of Red Cedar.

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Thursday night he also dropped off some Cherry and some Apple.


This will go well with the Walnut, Cherry, and Oak Burl I have in my stash pile.

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Which is next to the wood bin.

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I keep planning on making doors for the wood bin and siding it in cedar shakes. Been a 3 year project but why rush into these things. LOL

Should make for some good turning.

---Nailer---

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:18 am 
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DennisS wrote:
Don't know what the red cedar is like in Mass. but out here what we have doesn't make very good turning wood. At least I don't like turning it. In fact it's rather toxic to the breathing system. Makes good shingles and shakes, though.


Two completely different woods, neither of them cedar, BTW. The Aromatic or eastern red Juniperus virginiana is one of the driest woods on the stump, and so oily that you can finish it by burnishing.

Not that I've turned much of it. My kid was transferring from Missouri to Germany a number of years back, and brought a trailer north on his visit. Couple hundred of leftover cherry and couple hundred of red cedar. The cherry was for me, I found. Of course I had plenty of cherry. The cedar was for a set of outdoor furniture he had promised his neighbor, and he just needed to get it made into S4S. I got maybe three boards, and reminded genius boy that the local cherry is more attractive and inexpensive, but red cedar doesn't grow until you're 300 miles south.

Only bad attribute on the eastern is its susceptibility to heat. It crackles and pops like Rice Krispies if you press while sanding.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2009 11:31 am 
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Location: Dayton Ohio
I cut some bushes down on the side of my yard and they looked exactly like that first photo of yours. It smell like cedar and looks like it but isn't. It also looks like it is bleeding. I cut mine into small blocks and turned pens out of it. it is real soft and catches the tool alot in getting it round but finishes nice. It even keeps a little of the aroma when done.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 9:56 pm 
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Location: Bainbridge Island, WA
That log looks like a tree we cut down a couple years ago (Western Washington). There's a little voice telling me you should be sure and wear long sleeves when turning it -- it might be one of those irritating woods when in sawdust or shavings form.


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