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 Post subject: Well, lets see,
PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:25 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 21, 1999 1:01 am
Posts: 2420
Location: Rochester MN USA
We do it to planes and chisels, router bits and knives but few of us sharpen a saw. I'd guess that most of our sawing is done with a bandsaw, "skilsaw" table saw, coping saw and on and on. BUT the first saw most up us used was a hand saw. We all probably have one stashed in the shop to use on the rare occasions that it's just quicker,cleaner, quieter and more suited to the delicate job of making a piece fit just so. But if the saw is dull, watch out! It will wander, tear the wood and perform so badly that it will get stashed in the shop....... the circle just goes on. Here's how to sharpen a saw and make it an essential tool in your arsenal.

http://www.vintagesaws.com/library/primer/sharp.html.


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 Post subject: Re: Well, lets see,
PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 1:17 am 
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Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2003 12:01 am
Posts: 1884
Location: San Diego, CA USA
Pete Taran, the author of that Primer gave me permission and I always include a copy with the packet issued to all the participants of my Saw Sharpening seminars. Gotta give a lot of thanks to Pete and others like him who have supported any/all efforts to keep the craft true to it's heritage. Great post. I would like to add that learning to sharpen a saw and then enjoying the performance of the tool will enhance one's gratification for accomplishment exponentially. Really is a joy to be able to grab a 100 year old saw and have it cut a clean & straight kerf, either crosscut or rip, in less time than it takes to set up the tablesaw. I have an old D 8 Disston with a thumbhole grip that I bought ten years ago at the swap meet for $5. It was one of the first saw restorations I did and it has been a shining star in my shop ever since....cuts through oak like a hot knife cuts butter..... and I see now that BadAxe Saw Works is making replicas and selling them for over $300. Really makes me feel fortunate..... I have a whole till full of restored saws that I treasure.... several made in the 1800's.
Thanks for the post!!

Don


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