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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2020 1:49 pm 
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Location: Cypress, TX
The pictures in my original thread on this topic were compromised.

How to build a naval carriage.

Pick up the wood 2" X 12" X 12'
Red Oak

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Rough out the sides and wheels and front transom
transom is cut with a 2 1/2 degree angle on each end. This will make the carriage narrower at the front and wider at the rear.
This part is easy.

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Glue stock for axles
turn axles on the lathe

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Make the cuts to mate the side cheeks with the axle. All cuts have to be done at 2 1/2 degrees also. Same with any hole drilled in the cheeks.
Also make the leveling platform.
The angles make everything harder.

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Drill the 2 1/4" trunnion pockets where the barrel will sit at 2 1/2 degrees.
The barrel will be secured in these pockets with capsquares. These are secured to the cheeks with bolts that run vertically through the cheeks and the axle also. Since these bolts are long (16" in two cases), I mark where I want the hole to start and where I want the hole to end, then connect with a line. Notice the pencil line on the cheeks.
I have to drill from both sides, top and bottom and get the holes to meet in the middle. I start with a spade bit but can only get 4 1/2" deep.

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Then I flip the piece and drill from the other side. Note that I had to tilt the table to get the right angle. I put a straight edge in the drill press and tilt the table till it matches the penciled line.

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Then I put a 15" spade bit in a hand drill and finish the cut. Total length of the cut was 11 1/2".

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Then the holes have to be continued at the proper angle through the axle. I use the long spade bit to start the hole taking care to stop before I drill through the shop floor. :oops: Then finish the hole with a regular bit .
All holes line up. 8)
Note the 2 1/2 degree cut in the axle picture.

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Front bumper guard is made to go under the transom and lock into the axle for strength.

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I don't have the barrel, which in this case was made during the war of 1812, so I have to make a simulated trunnion to make sure everything fits together properly.

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Zulu's website
http://www.jmelledge.com


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2020 1:56 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2009 2:48 pm
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Location: Cypress, TX
I finished the metal work. I neglected to take any progress pictures. :confused: :confused: :oops: :oops:
Next is stain and paint.

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Stain is finished. It will go together when it dries completely. I know you can't tell much from the pictures.

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Finally finished! :-D
The finish is still a little soft. I will wait a few days before packing and shipping.
I'll post pictures when my customer gets his barrel mounted. Hopefully it fits.

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Zulu's website
http://www.jmelledge.com


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2020 2:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2009 2:48 pm
Posts: 1048
Location: Cypress, TX
How capsquares are made.
My home made 12 ton hydraulic press and my fixtures.

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_________________
Zulu's website
http://www.jmelledge.com


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2020 6:33 pm 
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 4:55 pm
Posts: 2300
Location: ridley park, PA
I love seeing pics of the metalworking! Did a little machining, forging and casting while in college for Industrial Arts Education.

Btw, my Dad was a pipe welder/pipe fitter his whole life. Worked at Baldwin Locomotives on steam engines and was one of the few pipe welders certified at Westinghouse Steam Division to weld pipe for nuclear subs and aircraft carriers. Grandad worked at Ball Anchor (I think that was the name of it) in Chester Pa making anchor chains for ships.

I stand corrected BALDT ANCHOR AND CHAIN was the name of the company Grand Dad worked for.

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"To all those who work come moments of beauty unseen by the rest of the world." Norman Maclean


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