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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 9:53 pm 
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Usually I use Tung Oil on my walnut boxes which darkens the color of the wood to a gorgeous tone.
Now I have a customer who want a box in a combination of Birdseye Maple and Walnut - and wants the walnut to stay a little lighter in color to better go with the maple.

I have found a good piece of walnut that is more of a 'milk chocolate' color.

Any suggestions on a finish or technique that would let the walnut stay that lighter color?

Perhaps a wash first with either shellac or BLO to seal the wood?


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 8:11 am 
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ZMan wrote:
Usually I use Tung Oil on my walnut boxes which darkens the color of the wood to a gorgeous tone.
Now I have a customer who want a box in a combination of Birdseye Maple and Walnut - and wants the walnut to stay a little lighter in color to better go with the maple.

I have found a good piece of walnut that is more of a 'milk chocolate' color.

Any suggestions on a finish or technique that would let the walnut stay that lighter color?

Perhaps a wash first with either shellac or BLO to seal the wood?


Unless you can get hold of some fresh, dewaxed absolutely clear (bleached) shellac I wouldn't use it. Even SuperBlond will darken the wood some. Certainly wouldn't use Seal Coat or other canned from the local big box hardware store. Here's a possible supplier: http://www.shellac.in/shellac_machinemade.html

BLO is possibly the worst choice. It's soft, and will darken over time.

As always, test whatever you decide on first. Good luck. :)

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 10:28 am 
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That has to be one of the more interesting questions I've ever seen about walnut. Most people enjoy the dark, rich tones of walnut.
Have you considered using another wood that might be closer in color to what the customer wants?
I don't have much experience in woodworking but, I don't think that I've ever seen any finish that doesn't make walnut naturally darker.
Maybe the answer is to not use any finish at all except maybe wax, and I'm fairly sure that even if it doesn't get darker right away, it will with time and exposure to light much like cherry does.
Just my dos centavos.

Rog

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 10:50 am 
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I was also thinking that maybe using a lighter wood might be the answer. Have you considered Sassafras? Might have more grain than you're looking for, but lighter in color than walnut.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 3:26 pm 
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ZMAN: Since water based poly has the reputation of being both clear and having little or no color character, why could you not thin a coat with about 20-30% water on a sample piece and see what it does. I don't think walnut grain popping is an issue with a customer that wants a milk chocolate look with the finish. The plus side is that you can know rather quickly if the poly will give you the "light" look that is called for. If the first coat works, then you can add coats for protection. Also I don't think that the water based poly will yellow over time just the walnut will. :idea:

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 6:26 pm 
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newtooth wrote:
ZMAN: Since water based poly has the reputation of being both clear and having little or no color character, why could you not thin a coat with about 20-30% water on a sample piece and see what it does. I don't think walnut grain popping is an issue with a customer that wants a milk chocolate look with the finish. The plus side is that you can know rather quickly if the poly will give you the "light" look that is called for. If the first coat works, then you can add coats for protection. Also I don't think that the water based poly will yellow over time just the walnut will. :idea:


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 4:51 pm 
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Daddy Gloves wrote:
newtooth wrote:
ZMAN: Since water based poly has the reputation of being both clear and having little or no color character, why could you not thin a coat with about 20-30% water on a sample piece and see what it does. I don't think walnut grain popping is an issue with a customer that wants a milk chocolate look with the finish. The plus side is that you can know rather quickly if the poly will give you the "light" look that is called for. If the first coat works, then you can add coats for protection. Also I don't think that the water based poly will yellow over time just the walnut will. :idea:


DITTO



Another vote for the Water base poly.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2017 1:42 pm 
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DITTO


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 12:00 pm 
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Thanks all - sounds like the right plan. Testing first.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2017 6:02 pm 
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ok, poly ok, perhaps try butternut


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