WWA Info Exchange

For Woodworkers By Woodworkers
It is currently Fri Nov 24, 2017 5:17 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 7:18 am 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2003 1:01 am
Posts: 287
Location: Cardington, Ohio
I know you shouldn't use oak in making a cutting board because the grain is open but does that include using the end grain?

Thank you
Jon

_________________
Thank you,
Jon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 7:31 am 
Offline
Veteran
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2004 1:01 am
Posts: 11212
Location: Hamilton, MS
JPG wrote:
I know you shouldn't use oak in making a cutting board because the grain is open but does that include using the end grain?

Thank you
Jon


Yes. Especially red oak. See this: http://www.wood-database.com/lumber-ide ... s/red-oak/

_________________
Gene


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 3:12 pm 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2003 1:01 am
Posts: 287
Location: Cardington, Ohio
Not to ask a stupid question but can you plane end grain? Does it chip bad? As you can tell I have never done it and I haven't made an end grain cutting board before.

Thank you
Jon

_________________
Thank you,
Jon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 3:49 pm 
Offline
Veteran
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2006 10:44 am
Posts: 3844
Location: Skagit Co WA
JPG wrote:
Not to ask a stupid question but can you plane end grain? Does it chip bad? As you can tell I have never done it and I haven't made an end grain cutting board before.

Thank you
Jon


If by 'can you plane' end grain you mean in a power planer, I'd say no. An emphatic no, in fact. Not to say it's not been done and done successfully but not worth trying in my book. That's just my humble opinion, of course. That said, a properly set up and sharp hand plane can be used somewhat effectively but if I had my druthers I'd opt for a belt sander, at least, and a drum sander as the best approach to flattening an end grain cutting board. Presuming from the title of the thread, that's where you're heading.

_________________
Nullum Gratuitum Prandium

Cheers - Dennis


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 4:01 pm 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2003 1:01 am
Posts: 287
Location: Cardington, Ohio
Thank Dennis. That's exactly where I am headed. Since I have never made one I am planning one it not being perfectly flat and I don't know the best way to flatten it. I am not the best with a belt sander and didn't think a thickness planer was a good choice. The cutting board will be 24x24 and I would like both sides to be as flat as possible.

_________________
Thank you,
Jon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 5:06 pm 
Offline
Veteran
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2004 1:01 am
Posts: 11212
Location: Hamilton, MS
JPG wrote:
Thank Dennis. That's exactly where I am headed. Since I have never made one I am planning one it not being perfectly flat and I don't know the best way to flatten it. I am not the best with a belt sander and didn't think a thickness planer was a good choice. The cutting board will be 24x24 and I would like both sides to be as flat as possible.


I hope you're not going to use oak for this. But beyond that, Dennis is right about planing. Best way to minimize the need to flatten after assembly is to make precise cuts, and allow the board to sit after glueup for a couple days - properly clamped with cauls - before attempting any flattening. Don't overdo the clamp force. I use a scraper to clean mine up.

_________________
Gene


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2015 5:40 am 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Fri May 30, 2008 5:41 am
Posts: 1790
Low angle (bevel up) smooth plane will do the endgrain pretty well. Best to use a toothed blade for surfaces way out of whack, followed by full edge. The block plane, of which it is a giant cousin, was made for the job.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 06, 2015 3:43 pm 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Thu Mar 04, 2004 1:01 am
Posts: 431
Location: Eagle River, AK, United States
Red oak is like a bunch of straws

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIXZ9iYM4PA

_________________
Alaskans for Global Warming


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 07, 2015 9:18 pm 
Offline
Veteran
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2005 12:01 am
Posts: 4737
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
Hey Guys,

I'll toss my 2ยข in and say that white oak makes very nice cutting boards. White oak is not porous like red oak, that's why it's used in casks made by wet coopers.

I also agree with NB George that you can plane end grain, and that a toothing plane is a good way to start. A high angle plane would also be a good idea, as would wetting the surface with some alcohol prior to planning.

All that said, I would prefer to use coarse grit on a drum sander if it's available. :wink:

Cheers,
Tom

_________________
"There is no path to peace, peace is the path."
Mohandas K. Ghandi
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2015 1:03 pm 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2003 1:01 am
Posts: 287
Location: Cardington, Ohio
Thank you

_________________
Thank you,
Jon


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group