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 Post subject: T5 plane question
PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 3:53 pm 
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In Rockfish's thread on required reading for Neanderthals, he mentioned the book Plancraft. Well I picked it up and have been glued to it. A wealth of information in there on the proper use and handleing of handplanes.

In this book, they take a full chapter dedicated to the Record T5 Technical Jack Plane. Now I realize that the book was written by the makers of this and many other iron planes at a time when they were working to move us from wooden planes to iron, so as you would expect, it's as much a sales tool as a referance book. Still, the T5 really intreged me, as it has broader sides for more stability when shooting boards, as well as the wooden side handle that could be screwed into either side to lend better control when shooting.

I've done a little looking on the net, and while there are still some T5s out there, they are pretty pricy, and far and few between. So my question is to anyone who has used one of these:

Is the side handle helpful?

If so, would it be bennificial to add one to an existing #5 Jack plane?

I feel pretty sure I could fabricate a handle with a machine screw attachment that could be inserted into either a threaded or through hole that coule be drilled into the sides of a plane. Finally, as I just bought a #6 Fore plane that has sides with the same expaned surface as the T5, would it be better to use this #6 for shooting than the #5. BTW, my current #5 is an el-cheapo Buck Brothers Jack Plane.

Thanks for the input.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 5:04 pm 
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BTW, my current #5 is an el-cheapo Buck Brothers Jack Plane.

I have one of those ... and have been planning to shoot it as well.

With buckshot.

It's not heavy enough to use as a boat anchor, and it's not flat enough to use as a door stop. Wish I could get more than .05 on 100#s for the steel.


But on to your question:

I think a handle would indeed help with shooting. I tend to get a bit of chaffing between my thumb and index finger (on the webbing) when shooting over a period of time.

However, I would recommend against drilling out your new WR foreplane for this purpose ... use an old beater to test out the principle.

Also the placement of the handle would be critical to its use (and comfort).

I've used a 5, 6, and 7 for shooting (even a 4 on occasion).

Personally I've settled on the 5 due to the right combination of weight and length. (Might also be because I have the most of those and therefore always have a sharp iron available :D ). Most of the stock I shoot isn't wider than 3" anyway.

I tire after used a 7 for longer periods ... though the added weight is nice. And for some things the length is necessary.

I tend to cramp up and get a lot of chaffing with a 4. Too small to hold properly on its side.

My #6 isn't quite tuned so I'm still on the fence ... as I like it so much for face jointing I wouldn't like to dull the blade by shooting. But to be fair I like the size and weight for the job.

Wait till you get the BU jointer and see how that works as a shooter.
Then decide. You might find that is the answer.
:D

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 6:42 pm 
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Yeah, I was thinking of using the Buck #5 as a test bed, figure I don't have much to loose with it. I can use pics of a T5 to guestimate a location. Once I prove the concept, I could then try it out on a good #5.

One tip I've gleaned from reading Planecraft, is that if you incline the platform of your shooting board, then you don't wear down just one spot on the iron. Your plane will still move straight across the board, but the board being shot will be at a slight angle, sort of like angling the plane itself, so that you engage the full width of the iron, or at least most of it.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 6:51 pm 
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that if you incline the platform of your shooting board, then you don't wear down just one spot on the iron...so that you engage the full width of the iron

Trust me when I tell you that you're better off with a flat shooting board as opposed to a 'ramped' one.

First, they are easier to build and maintain.

Second, the ramp would have to be rather extreme for this to be the case; or the stock be >5" wide. In other words, it's not worth the hassle. Shooting end grain is hard on plane blades, you'll have to resharpen often anyway; what difference does it make if the 'divit' is 1/2" or 9/16"?

I built a ramped shooting board (based on the ideas in this book [and other sources]) and can show in pictures what this means if you like.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 6:56 pm 
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Quote:
...sort of like angling the plane itself, so that you engage the full width of the iron, or at least most of it.


Hey Frank,

Actually, the effect is quite a bit different. When you turn the plane at an angle and move the blade in slicing motion, you have reduced the apparent angle of the blade, and so less force is needed. However, you also will have also reduced the pitch, so you may end up with more tear out.

When you ramp your shooting board, you are making full use of the blade width, but you are not changing the apparent angle of the edge. At any moment in the stroke, the wood is still meeting a spot on the edge at right angles to width of the blade.

Tom

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 6:56 pm 
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No, I see your point. I hadn't really thought about the maintenance of the board itself. The book is also the only place I've seen this tip. Could be that it was an idea that was shot down back in the 1930's. :roll:

Thanks for saving me the time and frustration. 8) Think I'll stick to a standard shooting board.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 8:37 pm 
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Hi Frank,

I do my shooting w/ a bench hook that TT made for me. I use my low angle jack plane. As long as you have a big flat side to the plane that is 90* to the sole, I think you are fine.

Also, I don't use a handle and it works fine for me.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 3:37 am 
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Frank ... sounds to me like we can safely say that you are well on your slide down the slippery slope. LOL I've been sliding for some time now and can tell you that you will find many ways to enjoy your planes. http://www.craftsmanstudio.com/html_p/A920.htm Shooting boards (sloped and flat) and edge guides and all manner of jigs will offer more and more ways to make shavings to your taste ... and wait 'til someone puts one of these: http://www.craftsmanstudio.com/html_p/A260.htm in your hands. But the REAL joy comes when you master sharpening so that all your babies whisper to you when you use them.
Welcome home, buddy!!
don


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 8:57 am 
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Rock - You are still using that bench hook? Good man!

I've been using my Veritas bevel up jointer for shooting and have been very happy with it. I tried shooting with block planes and other smaller bench models, but never had the success with them as I do with the longer, heavier one.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 9:50 am 
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I shoot with a #9 miter plane which has a "hotdog", go to LN site to see one. You could easily make one from a piece of 3/4" dowel and a set screw. My plane came with a side knob but I find the hotdog much more comfortable in use.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2010 12:29 pm 
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Thanks again guys. I checked out the "hotdog, and you're right, I could easily turn and make my own for pennies. That way I could make it to fit any of my larger bench planes.

Gee, I thought it was rough when I slipped into the turning Vortex. That's got nothing on the Hand Plane slope. :wink:

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