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PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 10:25 am 
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If none of these other methods get you to the color you're looking for, you might want to check this out.

http://www.micromark.com/Age-It-Easy-Gray

Used to color things in train gardens and only comes in small bottles. Not sure what kind of coverage you get from one bottle, but reportedly looks authentic. Cheaper if you buy more than one, but might still be to pricey for your project.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:16 pm 
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John Boy wrote:
If none of these other methods get you to the color you're looking for, you might want to check this out.

http://www.micromark.com/Age-It-Easy-Gray

Used to color things in train gardens and only comes in small bottles. Not sure what kind of coverage you get from one bottle, but reportedly looks authentic. Cheaper if you buy more than one, but might still be to pricey for your project.


Thanks John, that looks interesting... But I live in HI and they only ship to the continental 48.. I'm kinda used to it by now. Shipping is never free either.

We do have a woodcraft store out here, so I'm gonna see if they have anything like that over there. :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 4:20 pm 
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Quote:
...

I was looking up oxalic acid, and I found that parsley and scallions have a high content of it... And I just happen know someone who has plenty of that stuff growing right now! I'm sure it will be easier to just buy it, but, do you know any tricks for extracting it straight from the plants?

I guess I can always google it. Just wondering if you ever tried it?


Sorry if that was a silly question you guys. I was just curious...

Now that I googled it, I see that it takes a chemist to do it.

I was hoping I could just make some parsley tea or something.. :oops:


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 9:46 pm 
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I stopped by Woodcraft today.... Didn't find exactly the thing, but this "wood bleach" was interesting.. I took a pic of the ingredients just for future reference;


Image

And I took this pic because it was just funny... Apparently, people go in there and test the product right on the shelves!
"it wasn't me!" 8)

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 9:49 pm 
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...I also went to Home Depot and picked up a few various things to experiment with. They had "Barkeeper's friend" over there too, so I got some of that.

I'll take some pics of all the experiments as they move along.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 4:46 am 
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I did some experimenting, and I'm starting to realize that this won't be as easy as I originally hoped...

When I was at the stores, I tried to find straight Lye, but I guess it's not that easy to find... so there's no Lye in the tests..

But I tried everything else I had around... even battery terminal cleaner... which actually made a nice effect! It wasn't what I'm looking for, but I do like the look it made!

I don't have any Oak scraps, so I used some old Douglas Fir.

The surfaces are just cut with a circular saw, freehand, and not sanded at all.

For each potion, I just poured it on and let soak in. Each piece had at least a half-hour in the sun while it dried.. And then I rinsed them all with the hose and wiped them down...

The powdered mixes were mixed pretty thick.

--------

The Hydrogen Peroxide did the best job of bleaching the wood.

The baking soda and water did the best job of making it look "old", but it wasn't anywhere near the color I'm shooting for.. "Too dark". But the patina does look pretty authentic.

But none of them turned grey at all, so I moved on to plan "B". More on that soon..

But here's the results from the preliminaries..

Image

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 5:56 am 
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...since all of my experiments failed, I went to "plan B"... Semi-Transparent stain.

It's a nice color, but it has too much blue in it... so I tried thinning it, tinting it, mixing it with white spray paint, etc, but I still didn't like it... The color was still "too rich"...

I was getting frustrated, and then a friend came by, so I took a break and we had a few beers...

As we talked about it, it dawned on me to spray a light coat of the white spray-paint as a base-coat... Just a light dusting... I gave it about 5 minutes to "flash", and then put the stain on top of it. After a couple minutes, I wiped it down.

I love the effect! The white base creates the silver look after the stain goes on.

The pic below is a compilation of various shots of the same board, all at the same time, but at different angles and different lighting. {Sorry about the crude editing}

I dusted the whole stick with the white spray paint, gave it 5 minutes, and then used various concentrations of the stain on top.

6/1 means 6 parts thinner, one part stain.
2/1 means 2 parts thinner...
(X2) means two coats of 2/1 (which actually made it lighter)
0/1 means pure stain right out of the can.

Image

I think I like the 2/1 formula... I think that's about as close as I'm gonna get.

And if I have to, I guess I can tint the final clear coat a little too.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:01 am 
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Hey Jim,

It's an impressive experiment but unfortunately oak and Doug fir have very different chemistries. Oak is much more acidic due to the tannins it contains. Those tannins will also react to make a much darker effect than in fir.

Did you read the PW article that I linked to? Given that you liked the effect of the white base coat, you might try the milk paint technique they outline.

Cheers,
Tom

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 1:17 am 
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tms wrote:
Hey Jim,

It's an impressive experiment but unfortunately oak and Doug fir have very different chemistries. Oak is much more acidic due to the tannins it contains. Those tannins will also react to make a much darker effect than in fir.

Did you read the PW article that I linked to? Given that you liked the effect of the white base coat, you might try the milk paint technique they outline.

Cheers,
Tom


Yes Tom, I did read the article, and thank you :thumbup: ... I went on to look up more vids about the milk paint, and it's a nice look, and it would probably be fine, but I'm trying to avoid the "paint" look. I want most of the color to be "inside" the wood, with just a satin-clear on top.

I understand about tannin too, but everything I found was about how about how to make it "darker" (or how to remove the dark stains), but my goal is to make it silver. The more pale, the better.

I have some cedar I could experiment with... But at this point, I'm really leaning toward that spray paint method. It seems like it might be pretty quick and easy, but I'm gonna do it a little different next time... I'm gonna dampen the wood with mineral spirits first, and then dust it... and I'm also gonna see what happens if I use grey automotive primer instead of, or under, the white spray paint.

I think "the key" will be the dry time between coats. I want them to "all" soak in... But, if I put the stain on too soon, I'll wipe too much of the base coat off when I wipe the stain.

...to be continued I guess... 8)


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:29 pm 
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What does ammonia fuming do to oak??


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 3:34 am 
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Paul Gauthier wrote:
What does ammonia fuming do to oak??

Wow, thanks for mentioning that! :thumbup:

I don't know about fuming, so I googled it, and this is the first vid that came up;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZqDh0wJIRw

It's not the color I'm shooting for on this particular project, but I love that effect! I might have to try that one of these days :D


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 12:09 pm 
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Jim2 wrote:
Paul Gauthier wrote:
What does ammonia fuming do to oak??

Wow, thanks for mentioning that! :thumbup:

I don't know about fuming, so I googled it, and this is the first vid that came up;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZqDh0wJIRw

It's not the color I'm shooting for on this particular project, but I love that effect! I might have to try that one of these days :D


IIRC - Works better with white oak than red oak.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 10:21 am 
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Jim,

If you are trying to find a way to "age" Oak, then you really must use Oak in your tests.
Tom is absolutely right about its characteristics.
In fact, even different trees of the same species will exhibit different characteristics in this process. Selecting boards that likely came from the same tree will help produce less variation in your finish. This true of all species, but more so when using a chemical change.

If you're looking for an "in the wood" change, then laying pigment upon the wood will not produce the results you're after.

Using scrap from the project is the tried and true methodology here.

And HotShot? Why not? But still ... so funny!

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