WWA Info Exchange

For Woodworkers By Woodworkers
It is currently Fri Nov 17, 2017 4:20 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: tool rests?
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2012 5:21 pm 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 1:01 am
Posts: 406
Location: Swede
I turn a lot at work with my students. The tool rests are getting dinged and hacked. In the afternoons I bring out my own gauges and chisels to play and to try to improve my turning skills.
After regrinding the tool rests today I thought of getting my own made up by a friend who works as an mechanic at a metal workshop nearby.
I remember I ve seen some in the US that was made of a circular rod just like the letter T. But that was in the old days... The diameter of the top of the "T"? If its 8 inches long. Would 3/4 diameter be sufficient?
Have any of you photos of custom tool rest you ve made your self?

/ Anders andersjustincase


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2012 7:14 pm 
Offline
Veteran
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2006 10:44 am
Posts: 3842
Location: Skagit Co WA
3/4" is plenty stout for a tool rest. The main thing is to make sure the post and cross bar are well mated to each other. There are some commercially available rests that are perhaps no more than 1/2" diameter.

I'll fetch a photo of one I made a while back later when I feel like braving the chill in the shop.

_________________
Nullum Gratuitum Prandium

Cheers - Dennis


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2012 7:15 am 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Fri May 30, 2008 5:41 am
Posts: 1790
Teach them to hold their tool to the rest with their other hand. No distance, no ding. Any rest made from cylindrical stock moves the fulcrum back from the work, which is not what we want to do. Commercial types using a 6mm tack-welded rod on mild steel are a common solution. http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/208256 ... -Post.aspx


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Toolrests made
PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2012 4:57 am 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 1:01 am
Posts: 406
Location: Swede
Yesterday the toolrests came back from my friends work shop. He charged an apple cake for his birthday so that was cheap!

[img]http://www.woodworking.org/photo/albums/userpics/13635/annhållx3.jpg[/img]
See "toolrest school1"

One made as an J hook for bowl turning. I saw that one in Sorbys website.
One made as an T bar. According to comments here that isnt ideal design but I ll try it anyway..
And the third one like a little table. I found some odd old turning chisels in a cupboard in school. Probably 50 years or older. BAHCO Swedish brand and a little old booklet about "The upside down gauge type - a new way to teach boys to turn"

It is supposed to eliminate chatter as it is a big surface to rest int on. The chisel design is like the photos. On some of them the "roof" is slooping and half round. On athers they are straight. According to the pamflet they are sheering instead of scraping. My friend made the tool rest after a photo in the book.
Illl go in to work next week to try them.
Thanks for watching.
Anders
[img]http://www.woodworking.org/photo/albums/userpics/13635/anhållschool.jpg[/img]
See "toolrest school2"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 19, 2012 7:26 am 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Fri May 30, 2008 5:41 am
Posts: 1790
The flat one's sold here as a box rest. People hollowing boxes get support further into the turning with it, unless it's like the one I have, where they cantilevered the flat portion and then attached an angled brace underneath that limits reach to maybe 2-3cm into a turning. Don't burnish a curl, just use a deburred edge on your scraper or a hook/ring tool. Means you don't (can't) have to tuck the nose down to start a shaving. Which is what you want to tell them about that round rest, for sure. Easy to tip and trap between rest and work.

Interesting shape on the double half-gouge tool, that's for sure. Lots of Scandinavian types emigrated to work in the woods here, so their traditions and tools followed. Can't say I've ever seen something like that at an estate sale, though.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: types of chisels
PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2012 9:50 am 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 1:01 am
Posts: 406
Location: Swede
NB, I forgot to mention that my friend also polished my old tool rests. No dings left - instead a mirror shine surface.

I took a photo of the booklet.

Image
See "selection"

I ve found 20 of them in the cupboard so I guess its a complete set. They are all stamped with "BAHCO" or "E A Berg". There are also illustrations how to tackle different projects for instance bowls.

Image
See "bowl tech"


Thanks for watching.
/Anders


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2012 6:50 am 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Fri May 30, 2008 5:41 am
Posts: 1790
Used to have to draw file the iron rests up at the school when the kids neglected to hold their hand and the tool to the rest. Worked fine. Cast iron has good slide.

Quite the set of tools, all apparently scrapers, use of which seems simple when just removing wood, but gets delicate when it comes time to actually smooth it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2012 8:07 am 
Offline
Veteran

Joined: Mon Nov 04, 2002 1:01 am
Posts: 1705
Location: Big Prairie Ohio USA
I make my tool rests out of round 3/4 stressproof steel, or 3/8 x 1 flat stock and they hold up quite well.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group