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 Post subject: Suggestions please
PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2010 2:37 pm 
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Section of walnut measuring 9" across X 15" long approximately felled one year ago. Was end treated at time. OK, what can I do with this, have nothing in mind !! Do not own a BS or have access to one.

Thanks


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See "Wood Burl"


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2010 3:15 pm 
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Well, you could send it to me. :wink: :D :D :D

You can do roughing cuts by hand with a chain saw or even a bow saw, to get it into the sized turning blanks that you are after. You could even use an axe or a froe if you have one. Once you have it down to managable chunks you could then turn to the TS or MS. I'm assuming that since you posted this in the Turning AO, that you are looking at using this for turning blanks.

What to make from it?

Bowls
Pens
Pepper/Salt Mill
Plate/Platter
Turned Boxes
Bottle stoppers
ETC.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2010 4:40 pm 
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Well you have another 8 years before it's dry on the inside. :D

As with Frank, I'm going to assume you have a lathe.

You'll need to prepare blanks. To do that you'll need to cut it in half, like this.


Image
See "Log Cut"


Cut it so you will have 2 "Y"s when done. This drawing shows how to cut a large log. The size of the section in the middle is dependent on the size pith (that brown area in the middle) At 9" the kerf of a chain saw may be enough to do the job, you may need it a little wider. The pith needs to be removed as this is where the cracking starts.

If you turn it now you need to finish what you start, because it will be very wet on the inside and will warp.

If it were me, I'd cut and put it on the shelf for another year or two.

You could rough turn it (about an inch thick), but you would still need to let it dry before you finish it.

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Jeff

If man made it, I can fix it.
If God made it we can pray for it.

Lessons I have learned:
NEVER MAKE ANYTHING OUT OF TEAK
Always remove the zero clearance insert before you tilt the blade DAMHIKT


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2010 10:07 pm 
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I agree with cutting it into 2 "Y"'s to display the best grain in the final turning. I had a honey locust crotch about that size last year that I cut that way. I just can't remember what became of the second half. I did turn one half into a platter, leaving it a bit on the thick side. I let it dry for about 8 months before I returned it to the lathe and finish turned it. It came out looking pretty good:

Image

Image


There is a series of video segments on Youtube showing the process I used when I returned it to the lathe. The first segment should show how thick I left the roughout.

http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p ... 732DA84BD1

Take care
Bob


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 8:51 am 
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Appreciate the feedback & wake-up call. Appears my mind is turning into sawdust as I never thought about "Y" cut. I turned some bowls from another section whilst wet, needless to say they are around here gathering dust to remount on lathe ( yes, bark still on lip )

Speaking of "pith" I used chainsaw to half of which left IMHO a tad of pith, OK when all is said & done the remainder of the pith is on the floor since this section becomes the bottom, have yet to figure out why cutting a 2 inch kerf is necessary. (or facsimile thereof)

Thanks folks.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 11:53 am 
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Knot -

You should have some nice, what they call "flame" figure from that crotch if I read the photo correctly. You'll want to slice off the two sides of the crotch, not down the middle into it. Hope that makes sense.

You need to slice out the pith, that two inch section you mention since that's the center around which the shrinkage takes place as the log dries. The outside of the log is the longest distance around the circumference so that's where the log will show the greatest amount of shrinkage. Imagine one of those folding fans like ladies used to carry years ago. A log shrinks much the same way the fan folds up.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 2:59 pm 
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Let me clarify the drawing.

This would be for a large log, say 18" to 24". A log that big could have a pith 2" in diameter and it needs to come out. Just slicing it in half is not good enough, DAMHIKT (Don't Ask Me How I Know That).

As I mentioned with your 9" diameter the kerf of the chainsaw might be enough to clear out the pith.

You mentioned leaving a tad of pith left. This is fine if you are going to rough turn it and cut it off. If I were going to put it on a shelf and let it sit, I would cut the rest of it off, again DAMHIKT. :wink:

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Jeff

If man made it, I can fix it.
If God made it we can pray for it.

Lessons I have learned:
NEVER MAKE ANYTHING OUT OF TEAK
Always remove the zero clearance insert before you tilt the blade DAMHIKT


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 1:30 am 
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This is what you're looking for:

Image

The piece on the right represents one side of the rip through the crotch. Lay out the biggest circle you can get from the crotch area then adjust the size to get the best grain pattern.

It's just my opinion but I think this crotch figure is best displayed as a shallow platter. Again, it's a matter of opinion whether the piece should be turned from the bark side or the heart side. Each reveals a different expression of the beauty of wood.

If yer totally confused and can't decide, please feel free to send that crotch to me. (hehehe)

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 21, 2010 8:24 am 
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I've been a turner of wet wood for years, and I would never deliberately plan to throw away any depth, extra width or possibly pretty wood before I looked. Wedge the thing so you can saw lengthwise, with the two hearts facing you. Mark the location of the single on the far end and make your best rocking cut precisely up the middle. You can always slab off more if the bark or juvenile wood (hardwoods don't normally have a "pith") looks like it may be a problem.

TURN SOON, don't leave it in the large. You'll turn it to a wall thickness of ~3/4 for a one foot diameter. Or perhaps a touch more. That way you may persuade the wood to twist and relieve growth and drying stress by deforming rather than destructive splits. You may, BTW, find some well-developed end checks in the piece already, if it's been out a while. You almost have to get rid of them, or they become a weak spot where new splits begin. You can also clean up the small growth rings where splits start when you do this. Be super critical as you look for preexisting splits. New ones are rare, but old ones will open.

The fern figure is vulnerable to flaking off, so dry the wood face down or covered for the first week or two in a higher humidity. Some people boil pieces like this to allow them to relieve stress by making the lignin fluid. Can give color problems, but said to save more than casual drying.


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